INSOMNIA

Insomnia
About Us

We often wish each other "good night" before heading off to bed. But for many, having a good night isn't possible, because something gets in the way.

For many Americans, what gets in the way is insomnia, a sleep disorder characterized by difficulty in falling and/or staying asleep.

If you have insomnia, you may:

  • Lie awake for a long time before falling asleep
  • Sleep for only brief, interrupted periods
  • Stay awake for much of the night
  • Wake up feeling as though you haven’t slept at all

If you’re having problems sleeping, consult your doctor. A review of your clinical history and physical exam may be sufficient to make the diagnosis. Polysomnography -- an overnight sleep study -- can be helpful to rule out other types of sleep disorders (such as a breathing-related sleeping disorder).

“In recent years, we have come to a better understanding of how the brain regulates sleep, and importantly, also the ways in which sleep can be disturbed,” said Darryle Schoepp, Ph.D., vice president and therapeutic area head, Neurosciences, Merck. “The science of sleep is fascinating, but what makes it meaningful is the hope that it will lead to solutions that result in better sleep."

How much sleep do we need?

The amount of sleep needed to maintain good health varies from person to person and changes throughout one's life. Roll over the boxes below to find out how much sleep the National Sleep Foundation recommends.

  • 16-18 hours
    a day
  • 11-12 hours
    a day
  • At least 10 hours a day
  • 9-10 hours
    a day
  • 7-8 hours
    a day

Learn more about insomnia

What causes insomnia, and what are its consequences? Merck and the National Sleep Foundation have collaborated to create an interactive educational website to answer these questions. It offers advice from sleep experts and information on insomnia symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. Learn more at http://sleepfoundation.org/insomnia/home.

 

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